Announcement from the Chancellor of the Exchequer

https://eastkingdomgazette.org/2017/01/13/announcement-from-the-chancellor-of-the-exchequer/

http://eastkingdomgazette.org/?p=11603

badge ExchequerFrom the Chancellor of the Exchequer:

The term of office for the East Kingdom Chancellor of the Exchequer will expire in June 2017. Applications are now being accepted for this office. The initial term for this office is two years. There is the option to request an additional two terms at one year each. Please note that I am NOT going to be requesting the last additional term.  Having served 3 years in this office, I now need to place my attention elsewhere.

Applicant letters of intent, resumes and questions are to be sent to these three addresses/offices.

Kingdom Exchequer

Kingdom Seneschal

Their Majesties

The duties and requirements of the office include:
• Managing SCA assets.
• Maintain current membership in the SCA for the duration of the time in
office.
• Serve as a member on financial councils.
• Is responsible directly to the Crown, but also reports to the Society
Exchequer.
• Will disburse funds in accordance with East Kingdom and Society
Financial Policies.
• Safeguards and maintains records of the monies of the Kingdom and
supervises the finances of the Kingdom.
• Receives monies allocated by East Kingdom Law or donated.
• Disburses the monies of the Kingdom in accordance with East Kingdom
Law.
• Makes a report of the Kingdom finances on a quarterly basis to The
Crown and Kingdom Seneschal.
• Supervises the Lesser Office of Kingdom Archivist.
• Supervises the Lesser Office of Kingdom Chamberlain.
• Supervises the Lesser Office of Kingdom Pennsic Steward.
• Is responsible for maintaining the financial records of the kingdom,
supervising the finances of the kingdom, and assembling financial
reports and submitting them to the Society Chancellor of the Exchequer
in a timely fashion.

Additional descriptions, expectations and or detailed requirements of
this office can be found in CORPORA & SCA governing documents, Society Financial Policy, EK-LAW and East Kingdom Financial Policy.

In service,

Maestra Ignacia la Ciega, East Kingdom Chancellor of the Exchequer


Filed under: Announcements Tagged: Exchequer, kingdom officers

Leurs Altesses souhaitent recevoir des recommandations pour les ordres votants.

https://eastkingdomgazette.org/2017/01/11/leurs-altesses-souhaitent-recevoir-des-recommandations-pour-les-ordres-votants/

http://eastkingdomgazette.org/?p=11600

Salutations à la population de l’Est !

Nous espérons que cette nouvelle année vous trouve en santé et comble vos espérances!

La date limite pour soumettre une recommandation pour le premier scrutin d’un de nos ordres votants sera le 20 janvier 2017. Veuillez envoyer vos recommandations par le site www.eastkingdom.org.

Nous attendons d’avoir de vos nouvelles.

Avec émotion et grand enthousiasme pour le futur,
Princesse Honing et Prince Ioannes

Traduction par: Behi Kirsa Oyutai


Filed under: Announcements, En français, Official Notices

EASTERN RESULTS FROM THE OCTOBER 2016 LoAR

https://eastkingdomgazette.org/2017/01/05/eastern-results-from-the-october-2016-loar/

http://eastkingdomgazette.org/?p=11597

The Society College of Heralds runs on monthly cycles and letters. Each month, the College processes name and armory submissions from all of the Kingdoms. Final decisions on submissions are made at the monthly meetings of the Pelican Queen of Arms (names) and the Wreath Queen of Arms (armory). Pelican and Wreath then write up their decisions in a Letter of Acceptances and Return (LoAR). After review and proofreading, LoARs generally are released two months after the meeting where the decisions are made.

An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society. A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work. Most items are registered without comments. Sometimes, the LoAR will address specific issues about the name or armory or will praise the submitter/herald on putting together a very nice historically accurate item.

The following results are from the October 2016 Wreath and Pelican meetings.

 

From Laurel: Farewell Lillia

The College of Arms has a rank of Herald Extraordinary that has a long and honored history. The rank was formally created and defined in the July 1981 cover letter by Wilhelm Laurel. The intent of the rank is to recognize and reward “… those heralds who have greatly served the College of Heralds and/or the College of Arms and have achieved the highest level of competence in heraldry.”

In light of her considerable contribution to the College of Arms through her efforts as Pelican Queen of Arms, I confer upon Lillia de Vaux the rank and style of Herald Extraordinary. I charge her to register a title of her choosing with the College of Arms.

I am very grateful for Lillia’s service, and I wish her the best in her future endeavors both within the College of Arms, and without.

 

Society Pages

On December 3, 2016, Master Malcolm Bowman, new Brigantia Herald of the East, named Master Ryan Mac Whyte, retiring Brigantia, a Herald Extraordinary.

 

EAST acceptances

Angelina Foljambe. Household name House of the White Elephant and badge. Azure, an elephant and a bordure argent.

The submitter requested authenticity for English. The inn-sign Black Elephant and the pattern of White + [animal] are found in Lillywhite’s London Signs dated to the 16th century. Therefore, this household name appears to be authentic for 16th century England.

Arabella De Mere. Name.

The submitter may wish to know that the form de Mere is more likely than De Mere. The FamilySearch Historical Records database typically capitalizes prepositions and other elements, even if they were not capitalized in the primary source.

This name combines an English given name with a French byname from the Netherlands. This is an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C of SENA.

This name does not conflict with the registered name Arabella de la Mer. A syllable has been removed and the vowel changed in Mere versus Mer. Therefore, this name is clear under PN3C1 of SENA.

Arsinoé Dragonette. Name.

Arsinoé is a French literary name.

Brandulfr Sæfinnsson. Name.

Submitted as Brandulfr Saefinnson, the name was changed in kingdom to Brand-Ulfr Sæfinnsson because Brand- and Ulfr- were documented as given names that could not be combined to form another given name. Instead, the name was modified to use Brand- as a prepended descriptive byname, so the name only had a single given name. In addition, the spelling of the patronym was modified from -son to -sson to match the documented form.

In commentary, Siren noted:

Brandulfr is a header form in Fellows Jensen; there’s a Brandulf in the Domesday Book (http://domesday.pase.ac.uk/Domesday?op=6&filterString=brandulf) and Brandlfsike is dated as a place name to the 13th-14th c. She admits that it is not impossible that it’s from a Continental Germanic name.

Therefore we can give the submitter the benefit of the doubt and register the submitted given name.

The submitter requested authenticity for a 10th century Norse name. This name does not meet this request because the given name is dated to the late 11th century from England and the byname is found in Iceland after the 10th century.

Brick James Beech. Device. Sable, on a chevron couched from dexter argent two footprints toes to dexter sable.

There is a step from period practice for the use of footprints.

East, Kingdom of the. Badge for the East Kingdom’s Southern Army. (Fieldless) Five mullets of six points conjoined in cross Or.

“East Kingdom’s Southern Army” is a generic identifier.

East, Kingdom of the. Badge for the East Kingdom’s Southern Army. Azure, five mullets of six points in cross Or.

“East Kingdom’s Southern Army” is a generic identifier.

Elaria Grenway. Name.

The submitter requested authenticity for “late 14th cen./early 15th cen. England”. The entire name can be documented to England in the 1580s, but not in the 14th or 15th century. Therefore, this name does not meet the submitter’s request.

Gregor von Medehem. Name.

Nice late 14th century German name!

Grímólfr Skúlason. Badge. (Fieldless) A closed book argent sustaining in chief a wolf couchant sable.

Ile du Dragon Dormant, Baronnie de l’. Order name Award of the Argent Mountain.

Ile du Dragon Dormant, Baronnie de l’. Order name Award of the Gold Mountain.

Ile du Dragon Dormant, Baronnie de l’. Order name Award of the Purple Mountain.

Lorencio Matteo Espinosa. Device. Per pale azure and vert, a covered cup Or within an orle of flames proper.

Merlyn Kuster. Alternate name Eyjolfr dreki.

Muiredach Ua Dálaig. Device. Sable, a fess azure fimbriated between two talbots passant respectant and a cross formy argent.

Ogurr Aðalbrandsson. Name and device. Per pale vert and sable, a drinking horn and a sword in saltire and on a chief argent a pair of shackles sable.

We note that the form {O,}gurr, using an O-ogonek, is found in Geirr Bassi. However, under Appendix D of SENA, we can register this name as submitted instead of changing it to the attested form.

Sigrida Arnsdottir. Name and device. Per bend vert and sable, a bend embattled counter-embattled between an eagle’s head erased and a stag’s attire in annulo conjoined to itself Or.

Siobhán inghean uí Ghadhra. Name and device. Per pale vert and purpure, a unicorn argent between three harps Or.

Urr{a-}ka al-Tha`labiyya. Badge. (Fieldless) A magpie proper perched on and maintaining a rapier fesswise reversed Or.

 

EAST returns

Esa Gray. Name.

This name was pended to allow discussion of whether it presumes upon the name of 19th century botanist Asa Gray. Asa Gray is the original author and current namesake of Gray’s Manual, the standard reference on North American plants, and is considered to be the most important American botanist of his time. In addition, he collaborated with Charles Darwin, arranged for the publishing of On the Origin of Species in the United States, and wrote defenses of the highly controversial theory of evolution. Although his name is largely known only to specialists, his work “significantly shaped the course of science” in the areas of botany and genetics. Thus, Asa Gray is important enough to protect under PN4D1 of SENA.

The submitted name Esa Gray can be identical in sound to the protected Asa Gray, so we are returning this name for presumption.

Upon resubmission, we suggest the addition of a Scots or English locative byname to avoid the appearance of presumption: Esa Gray of X.

This name was pended from the May 2016 Letter of Acceptances and Returns.

Sitt al-Gharb ha-niqret Khazariyya. Badge. (Fieldless) Two winged monkeys combattant each maintaining two daggers the center daggers crossed in saltire Or.

This badge is returned for redraw, for violating SENA A2C2 which states “Elements must be drawn to be identifiable.” Commenters had trouble identifying the winged monkeys, probably because the daggers make the outline more confusing than the one used in her device.

 


Filed under: Uncategorized

Award Recommendations for Their Highnesses

https://eastkingdomgazette.org/2017/01/04/award-recommendations-for-their-highnesses-2/

http://eastkingdomgazette.org/?p=11590

Their Highnesses

Greetings to the populace of the East!

We hope the new year finds you all well and hopeful.

We will be accepting award recommendations for our first polling until January 20th 2017. Please send your award recommendations via the www.eastkingdom.org website.

We look forward to hearing from you.

With much love and excitement for the future,
Princess Honig and Prince Ioannes


Filed under: Uncategorized

Arts & Sciences Research Paper #16: The Double Bind: Thomas Campion and Elizabethan Women

https://eastkingdomgazette.org/2017/01/03/arts-sciences-research-paper-16-the-double-bind-thomas-campion-and-elizabethan-women/

http://eastkingdomgazette.org/?p=11582

Our sixteenth A&S Research Paper comes to us from Lord Drake Oranwood of the Shire of Rusted Woodlands, who examines the work of the Elizabethan songwriter Thomas Campion, and uses his texts as a way to look closely at the role of women in that complex society. (Prospective future contributors, please check out our original Call for Papers.)

The Double Bind: Thomas Campion and Elizabethan Women

Young Lady Aged 21, possibly Helena Snakenborg, later Marchioness of Northampton.

Young Lady Aged 21, possibly Helena Snakenborg, later Marchioness of Northampton. By English School, 16th century [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The role of women in Elizabethan society is something that quickly called attention to itself from my first studies of Elizabethan popular songs. In developing an Elizabethan persona, I become quite fond of lute songs, as exemplified by John Dowland and his less-celebrated colleague, Thomas Campion. The more of these pieces I learned, however, the more troubling I found the attitudes about women that peeked through (between the lines, as it were). It is no secret that women lacked social equality with men throughout the Medieval and Renaissance period. Still, these pithy bits of popular entertainment provided a surprising window into the conflicting, contradictory, and inescapable demands to which women, particularly young women of the upper classes, were subjected. These quandaries of inequality have existed throughout history, of course, but the writings of the 16th century (written primarily by men) rarely articulated it as such or gave it a name. In the twentieth century a term emerged for this sort of paradoxical dilemma and the strain it places on its subjects: the double bind, which describes “a situation in which a person is confronted with two irreconcilable demands or a choice between two undesirable courses of action.” (Oxford English Dictionary)

In this article, I will examine primarily two songs from Campion’s first songbook, A Book of Airs (1601).[1] These two songs can, if juxtaposed together, be read as telling the story of an Elizabethan relationship first from a man’s perspective, then the woman’s contrasting one. This tale may serve to shed a light on the double bind faced by women Campion observed, and the different constricting forms it took. During Elizabeth’s reign, the power and entitlement men held over women, the conflicting roles and demands placed upon women of status, particularly in matters of sexuality, metastasized into ever more beautiful but suffocating forms.

Song XII.</p>

Thou art not fair, for all thy red and white,
For all those rosy ornaments in thee;
Thou art not sweet, though made of mere delight,
Not fair nor sweet, unless thou pity me.
I will not soothe thy fancies: thou shalt prove
That beauty is no beauty without love.

Yet love not me, nor seek thou to allure
My thoughts with beauty, were it more divine:
Thy smiles and kisses I cannot endure,
I’ll not be wrapt up in those arms of thine:
Now shot it, if thou be a woman right,—
Embrace, and kiss, and love me, in despite!

 

 

Song V.

My love hath vowed he will forsake me
And I am already sped.
For other promise he did make me
When he had my maidenhead.
If such danger be in playing
And sport must to earnest turn,
I will go no more a-maying.

Had I foreseen what is ensued,
And what now with pain I prove,
Unhappy then I had eschewed
This unkind event of love.
Maids foreknow their own undoing,
But fear naught till all is done,
When a man alone is wooing.

Dissembling wretch! to gain thy pleasure
What didst thou not vow and swear?
So didst thou rob me of the treasure
Which so long I held so dear.
Now thou prov’st to me a stranger,
Such is the vile guise of men,
When a woman is in danger.

That heart is nearest to misfortune
That will trust a feigned tongue.
When flatt’ring men our loves importune,
They intend us deepest wrong.
If this shame of loves betraying,
But this once I cleanly shun,
I will go no more a-maying.

Our exploration begins with “Thou art not fair”, a fairly typical love song of its time (and indeed many others), but which has a few features of particular interest to us. A male lover’s plea for his lady’s favor, it begins as many such pieces do with sharp accusation:

Thou art not fair, for all thy red and white,
For all those rosy ornaments in thee…

With classic Elizabethan word-play, Campion opens with a heavily loaded phrase: “Thou art not fair”. By punning on the word “fair”, our suitor is actually accusing his lady-friend of falling short of two ideals about English women, both of them double binds. He is calling her ”unfair” in the sense that she is denying him what he is entitled to as a man (and we shall explore that point in detail shortly). He is additionally suggesting she is not “fair”, meaning beautiful according to the standards of the day. But with “for all thy red and white” and “rosy ornaments”, he adds a third, literal, meaning to “fair” that illuminates those standards of beauty: she is not pale-skinned (or less so than she appears). He is accusing her of wearing makeup, which by the end of 16th century had become a special sort of insinuation.

Portrait of Dorothy, Lady Dormer (1577 - ?), daughter of Sir Robert, 1st Baron Dormer, of Wing (1552-1616)and wife of Henry Hudleston of Sawston.

Portrait of Dorothy, Lady Dormer (1577 – ?), daughter of Sir Robert, 1st Baron Dormer, of Wing (1552-1616) and wife of Henry Hudleston of Sawston. By Unknown English: English School (image) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Women’s makeup came into common use in the nobility during Elizabeth’s reign, popularized by the Queen’s copious use of it to achieve a particular idealized standard of beauty: “Pale skin was a sign of nobility, wealth, and (for women) delicacy, and was sought after by many. In a time when skin problems and the pox were commonplace, sunscreen unheard of, and skin creams and ointments out of reach for all but the well-off, smooth, unblemished and pale skin was a rarity.”[2]

Of course, most cosmetic formulations to create this alabaster skin, along with rosy lips and cheeks, were highly toxic and damaged the skin (and when lead was part of the mixture, the brain) with prolonged use. Elizabeth herself, as she aged, suffered from her constant use of cosmetics in public, and thus relied on them ever more heavily, which in turn subjected her to an increasing level of subversive mockery. In living up to men’s expectations of beauty, English noble women found themselves increasingly suspected and accused of being painted impostors wearing false fronts to disguise their bodies’ decay. By late in the reign, literary jabs at noblewomen for their made-up paleness were fairly common. Campion, ever the wit, made use of the trope elsewhere, for example in “I care not for these ladies” from this same songbook:

I care not for these ladies,
That must be wooed and prayed:
Give me kind Amaryllis,
The wanton country maid.
Nature art disdaineth,
Her beauty is her own.
For when we court and kiss,
She cries, “Forsooth, let go!”
But when we come where comfort is,
She never will say no.
If I love Amaryllis,
She gives me fruit and flowers:
But if we love these ladies,
We must give golden showers.
Give them gold, that sell love,
Give me the nut-brown lass, …

Campion contrasts the upper-class “ladies” in question with the more accessible earthiness of Amaryllis, whose “beauty is her own” (i.e., not painted on), and whose body, tan from outdoor work, is far more readily available, with much less fuss, to men. Ladies’ makeup is a protective coating which makes them artificially beautiful, and less attainable, and the suitor of “Thou art not fair” mocks his lady’s (likely compulsory) use of it, hoping to lower her defenses:

Thou art not sweet, though made of mere delight,
Not fair nor sweet, unless thou pity me.
I will not soothe thy fancies: thou shalt prove
That beauty is no beauty without love.
Yet love not me, nor seek thou to allure
My thoughts with beauty, were it more divine:
Thy smiles and kisses I cannot endure,
I’ll not be wrapt up in those arms of thine:
Now shot it, if thou be a woman right,—
Embrace, and kiss, and love me, in despite!

Lowering her defenses is indeed his aim, and he will carp at her until she bestows her “pity” on him. A classic trope of male entitlement (still widespread today, but rife in songs of the period) is the notion that a woman’s beauty holds such power over a man that it is cruelty beyond measure for her to tempt him with “smiles and kisses” but withhold sexual favors. Her “beauty is no beauty without love,” and note the ascending scale of the demands: “Embrace, and kiss, and love me, in despite!” Thus the suitor makes plain one end of the greater double bind we alluded to earlier—male entitlement. A desirable woman is hateful if she rejects a man’s sexual needs.

No thought is given in the piece to what the woman in question wants, or whether it is compatible with the man’s sense of entitlement; this is a commonplace of the genre. As Theresa D. Kemp observes, “The modes and genre of courtly love…rarely image an inner life or subjectivity for the lady; she is merely the object of the speaker’s desire.” (Women in the Age of Shakespeare, p. 3.)[3]

So, what if she acquiesces to the fervent plea, and gives herself to the poor fellow (as he appears to imagine himself), instead of taunting him with her supposedly deadly power? It is one thing for the low-born Amaryllis to freely enjoy the delights of the flesh with a man, but quite another for a “red and white” painted (and doubly bound) lady to do so. In “My love hath vowed,” Campion unspools the fate of a girl who makes this choice and faces the consequences of yielding to a man’s sexual entitlement. His telling suggests empathy for her plight, and yet surely this would have served as a stern warning and cautionary tale to any young woman of the day who heard it.

My love hath vowed he will forsake me
And I am already sped.
For other promise he did make me
When he had my maidenhead.
If such danger be in playing
And sport must to earnest turn,
I will go no more a-maying.

In contrast to the supposedly romantic sparring of the previous song, here we discover the aftermath of a consummated tryst. This young woman’s lover wastes no time “forsak[ing]” her on learning of her pregnancy, and, she is “already sped” from the scene of her shame. Her confession—that she gave him her “maidenhead”—is startlingly explicit for Elizabethan songs, which referenced sex constantly, but always veiled in coded language and wordplay. (“Maidenhead,” while used a few times by Shakespeare, appears in no other extant lute song of the period.[4]) There is “danger” in “playing” indeed: she has been ruined socially. This, then, is the other side of the double bind of men’s sexual entitlement: a pregnant, unmarried noblewoman has no bright future in this society.

The Elizabethan age was a period of great change, and a number of scholars mark Elizabeth’s coronation as the true beginning of the English Renaissance. To the extent that term “renaissance” means “rebirth”, however, it cannot be said to have been a step forward for women in Europe, and this was as true in England as anywhere.[5] In a world led exclusively by men, the rise of a woman to the supreme power might suggest the possibility of new equalities, but English society at large responded to this development with, if anything, a hardening and tightening of attitudes about power. In the decades prior, social changes had already been working to make life for high-born English women increasingly constricted and binding, more like a vise than a corset.

Crucially, the role of upper-class women had been shaped increasingly by concerns around wealth and inheritance. The jaws of the vise predated this era: the 14th-century establishment of primogeniture (the eldest male heir would now always be first in line for inheritance), and Henry VIII’s abolition of England’s monasteries in 1536 as part of the Reformation (eliminating convents, the one option for women to have an independent livelihood and life of the mind, outside the sway of men to a greater degree than secular life afforded). By Elizabeth’s time, an unmarried woman generally could not own or run a business on her own, and if married, all property was in the husband’s name. The only alternative to marriage was now domestic service.[vi] (Elizabeth herself famously avoided marriage, and the attendant loss of power and status, despite constant public pressure for an heir—and, of course, her choice not to provide one would end the Tudor line and her legacy of power.)

Had I foreseen what is ensued,
And what now with pain I prove,
Unhappy then I had eschewed
This unkind event of love.
Maids foreknow their own undoing,
But fear naught till all is done,
When a man alone is wooing.

In late sixteenth-century English society, then, upper-class women were valued exclusively for their marriageability even more than before. This required them to be as beautiful as possible (as evidenced by the obsession with paleness and cosmetics), but also, crucially, chaste. In a world where a high-status family used daughters to secure wealth, and a wealthy family used daughters to secure status, the assumption of virginity was essential to those transactions. Our song’s heroine has learned this lesson the hard way, through the “pain” of pregnancy and being shunned by society. She reflects how “maids” (in the parlance of the day, virgins) should anticipate “their own undoing,” but do not consider the consequences until too late.

Dissembling wretch! to gain thy pleasure
What didst thou not vow and swear?
So didst thou rob me of the treasure
Which so long I held so dear.
Now thou prov’st to me a stranger,
Such is the vile guise of men,
When a woman is in danger.

Moving from regret to anger, Campion affords his heroine the clarity to cast (legitimate) blame on her suitor, who as she has already hinted, was eager to “vow and swear” his love in order “to gain [his] pleasure” of her. She reminds the audience, lest they forget, of the loss of “the treasure / Which so long I held so dear”: her virginity. But note the harsh language with which she accosts her seducer: he is a liar, a thief, and ultimately a coward, content to evade the consequences of his wants, as she cannot.

It is intriguing that, for once, Campion spares a thought to acknowledge a man’s culpability in the double bind and the plight of this friendless woman. It is noteworthy in particular that (in the lady’s voice) Campion calls the man out for being untrue to her, both before and after getting his “pleasure”. This would appear to be a very conscious reversal of a ubiquitous trope of the time: that it is women who are false, lacking in honesty and courage. At the heart of each of the double binds faced by the Elizabethan woman, is the Elizabethan man’s constant suspicion of her. The cosmetics she wears to present the image that patriarchal society demands, of pristine youth and beauty, becomes proof of her inherent wily deception and falseness. And the man who demands that a girl remain a virgin until marriage, but who sings joyfully of a man’s sport in using his persuasion and power to take that virginity from her as he feels entitled, will ever wonder whether his fiancée, or his bride, is the virgin he takes her to be. If the Elizabethan woman’s power—the only one afforded to her—is her beauty and sexual allure, then every man’s fear is that she will make use of that power to satisfy her wants, rather than her husband’s. This fear appears to have the effect of drawing the vise ever tighter around the women of the age, with constant reminders that the risks in the game of sexual license and deception are not equally shared, but fall almost entirely on women. Thus does “My love hath vowed” conclude, with a doleful reminder and warning:

That heart is nearest to misfortune
That will trust a feigned tongue.
When flatt’ring men our loves importune,
They intend us deepest wrong.
If this shame of loves betraying,
But this once I cleanly shun,
I will go no more a-maying.

Our heroine sees the entitlement double bind clearly, and speaks now to her countrywomen, warning of the “feigned tongue” of men who risk nothing, to entrap women who risk everything for these moments of pleasure. The attendant “shame of loves betraying” has been her “undoing”, and she hopes others will follow her example going forward to “cleanly shun” such exploits.

Thomas Campion devoted over 10% of his creative output—14 songs out of 119—exploring a woman’s perspective, which was highly unusual for a writer of his day. If Campion, in his own essays, claimed not to place particular value on his mostly light-hearted English lyrics (Latin was the language for serious writing), he nevertheless slipped into them some sharp observations about the society he lived in. Certainly he knew well the double bind of the Elizabethan woman: ever primed and encouraged to be the target of male gaze and yearning, but subject to men’s harsh judgment whether she refuse, or respond in kind; ever pressed to be beautiful and alluring, but virginal; her life, freedom, and sexuality suborned in the service of men’s ambitions. In his songs it is hard to miss the dilemma, bound tightly (and pulling in opposite directions) around every noblewoman in England, up to and including Elizabeth herself.

Notes

[1] Philip Rosseter, Campion’s closest friend and a skilled lutenist, published this first book under his own name, but devoted the first half to Campion’s songs. After this Campion went on to publish subsequent songbooks under his own name. Campion was unusual as an Elizabethan songwriter who wrote his words and music together (the common practice was to add the tune or more often the lyrics later, which is why most lyrics for songwriters like John Dowland are considered anonymous). Rosseter, however, is generally credited with helping Campion with tunes and arrangements. The depth of their friendship was such that Campion, who died a bachelor, bequeathed what paltry wealth he possessed entirely to Rosseter, wishing it were more.

[2] Leed, Drea, “Elizabethan Make-up 101”. 

[3] Kemp, Theresa D. Women in the Age of Shakespeare. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood Press, 2010. Also available at http://www.abc-clio.com.

[4] Karlsson, Katarina A. ‘Think’st Thou to Seduce Me Then?’ Impersonating Female Personas in Songs by Thomas Campion (1567-1620). (p 74) Thesis. University of Gothenburg, 2011. Kållered: Ineko AB, 2011. ResearchGate. ArtMonitor. Web.

[5] Kemp, p. 26.

[6] Kemp, p. 19-36.

 

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Filed under: A&S Research Papers, Arts and Sciences Tagged: a&s, Arts and Sciences